Traveler

Discuss the Jerry Montgomery designed pocket cruiser SAGE 15 (sloop) and SageCat (catboat version of the Sage 15)

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noel
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Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:27 pm

Traveler

#1 Post by noel » Fri Jul 19, 2019 2:16 pm

Hot, humid, pop up thunderstorms and no wind. Too much time to think. Dangerous :) .

Sailing friend modified the traveler on his O’Day 23. See image. Wondering if there are any benefits of doing something similar on the Sage 15? He feels he can better trim the main with this now adjustable traveler. Toward windward in lighter conditions. To lee when slightly overpowered.
E32EB800-C559-4DB3-A4E8-FCA33EBCA9A7.jpeg

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sal
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Re: Traveler

#2 Post by sal » Thu Aug 01, 2019 7:19 pm

Hi Noel,

One can always improve a design for performance.

sal

noel
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Re: Traveler

#3 Post by noel » Thu Aug 01, 2019 7:51 pm

Question regarding the construction of the transom. Is it a solid piece resulting in the mating of the cabin top/cockpit and hull? Or is there a core material sandwiched between the two shells?

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sal
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Re: Traveler

#4 Post by sal » Sat Aug 03, 2019 1:12 pm

There is core material where bolts go through in the stern. The joint is solid..

In my opinion, the best place for a traveler is the set-up that Jerry designed for the 17. It's hard to add once the boat is decked.

sal

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Jerry
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Re: Traveler

#5 Post by Jerry » Sat Aug 24, 2019 11:39 am

Yes, Noel, there is a slight advantage; noticeable when racing, probably not otherwise, in the ability to adjust the transom traveler.

About a hundred years ago, when we were racing M-10s and 12s, both of which had a transom rope traveler, we would adjust them with a clam cleat a little different from the O'Day shown but with exactly the same results. We would adjust the traveler so that upwind it would be "2-blocked"; in other words the trav block would be just about touching the main sheet block, sailing upwind. In light air this would center the boom with less sheet tension, which would control the amount of twist in the sail. If the wind picked up, we'd tighten up the traveler as needed.

This is done on many small boats that are raced. I first saw it on M-10s of the three Armstrong brothers, sailmakers all, and very experienced dinghy sailors. The first year we raced the 10 they would stomp me, but I learned from them and eventually caught up. We had some outstanding sailors in the ten fleet; the Armstrong bros, Carolyn Newcomb (who had won the Adams Cup, which is/was a Newport Beach woman's match racing series using keelboats). Dave Ullman sailed with us once, also Skip Elliott, both sailmakers. Nancy Kilpatrick, who was my office mgr for several years and probably had an IQ of about 400, won a few races and was really tough in light air. Them were the days!

Sorry to go on, yes the adjustable traveler is an advantage! Do it if you're tuned in to performance.

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